Skip to main content

Full text of "Commoner, 1945"

See other formats


^ 






f({93L 




Hello! And a friendly welcome to you. Do come in 
and visit with us through the school year of 1944-45. 



To^ewo^b 



"Onward. Christian Soldiers." how our hearts thrill and respond to 
such a stirring challenge! It is our hope, in letting the lines of this song 
speak through these pages, that within the hearts of those who in later years 
dream of days of their youth, there may arise a "swansong" more sincere, 
sweet and clear than ever. 



Onward, Christian Soldiers 

Onward, Christian soldiers, marching as to war. 
With the cross of Jesus going on before: 
Christ, the royal Master, leads against the foe; 
Forward into battle, see His banners go! 

Onward. Christian soldiers! 
Marching as to war. 
With the Cross of Jesus 
Going on before. 

At the sign of triumph, Satan's host doth flee: 
On, then, Christian soldiers, on to Victory: 
Hell's foundations quiver at the shout of praise; 
Brother, lift your voices, loud your anthems raise! 

Crowns and thrones may perish. Kingdoms rise and wane. 
But the church of Jesus constant will remain: 
Gates of hell can never 'gainst that church prevail: 
We have Christ's own promise, and that cannot fail. 

Onward, then, ye people, join our happy throng! 
Blend with ours your voices in the triumph-song; 
Glory, laud and honor unto Christ the King. 
This through countless ages men and angels sing. 



BRYAN UHJVERSITY LIBRARY 




THE 1945 COMMONER 




WILLIAM JENNINGS BRYAN UNIVERSITY 
Dayton, Tennessee 



We Itave Ukud s own premise, anc) that cannot kali" 





Hail to thee, Bryan, our Bryan beloved- 
School of ideals, of sunlight and song! 



Cn 











UedicatioH 



"» ,-t 






The sweet fragrance of a life enriched by 
all the Christian virtues, a life of sacrifice, in- 
dued with a thirst for knowledge so that he 
might impart to the youth he loves priceless 
riches, our teacher, our friend, our sponsor. 
Dr. Glenn Gates Cole. 

Dedicated by his "children" who love him 
with an adoration born of his graciousness, 
the sweet fellowship enjoyed in his company, 
and the words of wisdom which pour from 
his life to our hearts — in whose honor, we, 
the Class of 1946, humbly present this issue 
of the Crr^-^^(^"rr 




."^ '- 





The Table Is Turned for the Faculf-y 

Thank you, faculty and staff! We owe you a debt of gratitude and praise 
for your hours of unselfish labor. Our prayer is that you may see in our lives 
the fruits of your labor and be assured that your sacrifice has not been in vain. 
We appreciate what you are doing for us and would like to thank you — • 

Mrs. Gather, for leaving your own home to make a home here for 
Bryan girls. 

Miss Hess, for making possible an ideal dining room. 

Miss Peck, for your endearing Christian qualities. 

Miss Batson, for making learning a pleasure. 

Miss Webb, for loyalty over and above what is reasonably expected. 

Mrs. Fish, for remembering the "little things" that we often forget. 

Mr. Fish, for willingness to go the extra mile. 

Dr. Cole, for outstanding intellect dedicated to Christ and to us. 

Dr. Morgan, for being youth's ideal — pleasantly mingling scholar- 
ship, spirituality and sociability. 

Mr. Hartman, for diligence and patience in developing talents for 
Christ. 

Mr. Ahonen. for being conscientious and steadfast. 

Dr. Rudd, words cannot express all that you are to us. 

"Glory, laud and honor unto Christ the King" for giving to us a faculty 
and staff such as you. 



The 1945 Commoner 



facult 



V 



JUDSON A. RUDD, A.B., M.A.. LL.D. 

President, and Professor of Mathematics and Economics 



LLOYD E. FISH, B.A.. M.A. 

Treasurer-Business Manager, and Professor of Psychology 
and N.T. Greek 



GLENN GATES COLE. B.S., M.S., ScD.. Litt.D. 
Professor of Science 

E. CARTER MORGAN. A.B., TH.M.. TH.D. 
Professor of Bible 



JAMES WILLIAM HARTMAN 
Professor of Music 

MRS. JAMES WILLIAM HARTMAN 

Instructor in Piano, and Director of Social Activities 



ARNE A. AHONEN, A.B., A.M. 
Instructor in French and History 

REBECCA M. PECK. B.A. 

Registrar, and Instructor in Commercial Studies 



JANET A. WEBB. B.A. 
Librarian and Instructor in English 

BEATRICE BATSON, B.A 
Instructor in English and History 





?m 



MRS. JUDSON A. RUDD, A.B. 
Women's Counsellor 

MRS, LLOYD E. FISH. B.A. 
Secretary to the President 



DOROTHY M. HESS 
Dietitian 



MRS. LOUISE GARBER 

Women's Counsellor and Assistant Dietitian 



N. O. BROOKS 

Accountant and Men's Counsellor 

PAUL ZIMMERMAN 

Director of Promotion and Extension 



ELMER R. WALTON, B.A., B.D, 
Field Secretary 



Not pictured: 

DR, ROBERT W. HAMBROOK 
Special Representative of the President 





CLEO GRAHAM 

F.M.F: Forensic 3. 4; '44 Commoner Circulation 
Manager: Gospel Singers 1 : Choir 1 ; Rifle Club 1 ; 
French Club 4. 



GWFN HAY 

Cheer Leader 1,2: F.M.F. 1, 2, 3, 4: Reg. Secre- 
tary 4: Child Evangelism 1, 2, 3: Forensic 1, 2, 
3. 4, Corresponding Secretary 2, 3, Recording Sec- 
retary 4: '44 Commoner Assistant Editor: Choir 1 ; 
Varsity Debate 1 : Journalism Club 1,2; Rifle Club 
1, 2: Cam. Club 1, 2, 3: Archery 1, 3, 4: Shake- 
speare Club 4, Vice-President; Student Council 4. 



a 



ass 



ANNA KETTENRING 

Secretary-Treasurer 3, 4: Lay Ambassadors 1, 2, 3: 
F.M.F 4: Child Evangelism 2, 3, 4; Shakespeare 
Club 4, Secretary-Treasurer: Who's Who 4; C.S.A. 
Council 2, 3 : Dorm. Council 4. 




BEATRICE MORGAN 

Choir 1: Lay Ambassadors 1, 2, 4; Shakespeare 
Club 4: Wheaton and Oberlin, 3. 



i 'IS 




JOHN QUIMBY 

Class President 4; F.M.F 2, 3, 4: Vice-Chairman 
Reg. 4: Forensic 1. 2. 3, 4, President 4; Lay 
Ambassadors 1 : Chairman Dorm. Committee 4 ; 
Vice-President Student Council 4; '44 Commoner 
Advertising Manager; Shakespeare Club 4: Cam. 
Club 1, 2, 3: Sp. Club 1 : Archery 4: Rifle Club 1. 



LILLIAN PECK 

Lay Ambassadors 1. 2, 3. 4. President 4: Forensic 
1, 2, 3. 4. Corresponding Secretary 4: Child Evan- 
gelism 1, 2; Archery 1, 3. 4: Cam. Club 1, 2. 3; 
Rifle Club 1, 2: Sp. Club 3: Shakespeare Club 4; 
Who's Who 3, 4: Physical Education Director 4. 



ALICE NORTHRUP 

Class Vice-President 4; Lay Ambassadors 1, 2. 3, 
Vice-President 2, President 3: Child Evangelism 
1, 2, 3, 4; F.M.F 4: '44 Commoner Business Man- 
ager: Student Council 1. 2, 3; 'Who's Who 4; 
Choir 1 ; Shakespeare Club 4. 



DOROTHY MORGAN 

Choir 1; Lay Ambassadors 1. 2. 4: Shakespeare 
Club 4; Rifle Club 2: Wheaton and Oberlin, 3. 





SENIOR CLASS 

Row 1 — Kettenring, 
Quimby. Northrup. 

Row 2 — Peck. Hay. Gra- 
ham. D. Morgan. B. Morgan, 
Mr. and Mrs. Fish. 



JUNIOR CLASS 

Row 1 — Dr. and Mrs. 
Cole. 

Row 2 — Brickel. Rogers. 
Birch. Miller. Miller. Wil- 
dern. Baldwin. 






CLASS OF '46 



MILDRED BALDWIN 
Secretary -Treasurer 

BETTY BIRCH 
Vice-President 



MARTHA BRICKEL 
President 

EDWARD MILLER 



EILEEN MILLER 
MARY B. ROGERS 




ANN WILDERN 



Not pictured — Dagmar and Frederic 
Brodt. 




C LASS 



DELBERT BAKER 



ELLEN CAMPBELL 



HAZEL NELL GEIGER 



^ 




£^i 








F '47 



ROSEMARY BODLE 



ANGIE GARBER 
Treasurer 



JEAN GULLEY 



LaVERNE ROWLAND 



RUTH KUHN 



MARJORIE MILLER 
Vice-President 




ELAINE KENNARD 



FRED MANNING 



FLORENCE MONCK 



BRUCE ROSENAU 
President 



RUTH WITZKY 
Secretary 

Not pictured — Earl Peck. 



^P"^ 
^^f "^"1^ ef 



^kM 





r^ 



FAITH WACHTEL 



WILLIS WITZKY 



#. 




IT 



SOPHOMORES 

Front to back — Geiger. 
Kuhn. Rowland. Bodle. Ken- 
nard. Witzky. Campbell. 
Garber. Gullev. Wachtel. 
Hess. Miller. Rosenau. Man- 
ning, Witzky. Monck. Baker. 



FRESHMEN 

Row 1 — ^Smith. Cooper. 
Marshall. Standen. Miller. 
Ahonen. Parden. Gow. Lord. 
Baldwin. Chapman. 

Row 2 — Martin. Dew. 
McBride. Hall. Massie. Cloer. 
Williams, Brooks. Hartman. 
Mead. 

Row 3 — Smith. Risser, 
Rager. Rager. Bechtel. Chris- 
ty. Rocs. 

Row 4 — L i e b . Peer, 
Turner. Mead. Jones. 










CLASS 



HELEN BALDWIN 



BARBARA BROOKS 
Secretary 



ELAINE CHRISTY 



JANE COOPER 



HELEN GOW 



GLORIA HARTMAN 



EDGAR LIEB 



CATHERINE MARSHALL 




^"^1 





F '48 



DONNA BECHTEL 



WILDA JEAN CHAPMAN 



GLORIA CLOER 



RUTH DEW 



ELLA LEE HALL 



WILLIS JONES 



HELEN LORD 



NORMA JEAN MARTIN 



C LASS 



MARY LOU MASSIE 



DALE MEAD 
President 



PHYLLIS MILLER 



EARLE PEER 
Vice-President 



GEORGENIA RAGER 



AUDREY RODS 



VERA MAE SMITH 



RUTH ELLA WILLIAMS 



ANNA LEE DRAKE 




F M8 



VIVIAN MCBRIDE 



LENA MEAD 



HELEN PARDEN 



ADAM RAGER 



DEAN RISSER 



PAUL SMITH 



RAYMOND TURNER 
Treasurer 



GEORGIA MAE STANDEN 



Not pictured — Laurel Summers. 




SPORTS 



An outdoor sport greatly enjoyed by the students is archery. With the coming of 
spring, when Cupid is darting about shooting his deadly missiles, it is estimated that 
many shall turn from their books and take to the great outdoors, where tennis, volley- 
ball, baseball, and recreation of various sorts will afford an opportunity to relax. 

These active outdoor sports help to take the students from the regular routine of 
studies on to the beautiful campus which provides a grand setting for sports of all kinds. 



Join our 



Thron 









This thru countless ages 



Q Dlessaae horn the Piesic)ent 



Christian Soldiers of the Cross: 

I call upon you as students, staff members and friends of Bryan University, 
to a greater loyalty to Christ and to the wonderful truths which are embodied 
in the cross on which He shed His precious blood. It was on the cross that 
Christ tasted death for each one of us. It was on the cross that He redeemed us 
to Himself. It was on the cross that we died to sin and were made alive unto 
God. It is in the shadow of the cross that we. His soldiers, are safe in the 
waging of the Christian warfare. 

On the cross, Christ did the will of the Father. He came not to do His 
own will but the will of the Father. Crucified with Christ, we are united in 
doing God's will and not our own. Christ, the Captain of our salvation, was 
perfected through sufferings. His cross makes sufferings a blessing to us instead 
of a curse. Remember that, dear ones, and also remember that by reckoning 
ourselves as dead with Christ on the cross, we are delivered from the power of 
the enemy and are made strong in the life of Christ to overcome all of our 
enemies. 

The Day of Prayer on March 3 was. I trust, the beginning of a forward 
movement into battle for Christ, based upon the Victory that is ours in the 
cross of our Lord and Saviour. Jesus Christ. We cannot fail! 

Yours in the Shadow of the Cross, 

JUDSON A. RUDD, President. 



"But God forbid that I should glory, save in the cross of our Lord. 
Jesus Christ, by whom the world is crucified unto me. and I unto 
the world." Gal. 6:14. 



22 The 1945 Commoner 



oienc) iviik Ou^s ^oul Vol 



ff 



cices 



Music is an integral part of Bryan University. Students have 
the advantage of private instruction and practical experience. Solo- 
ists and ensembles are prepared and presented in churches and are 
regularly a feature of the mission work sponsored by the University. 
Music talent represents a portion of our daily chapel service. 

Professor Hartman, better known as "Uncle Jimmie" has put 
much time and effort in making our Music Department desirable, and 
music courses the most popular offered at Bryan University. The 
beautiful musical recitals presented under the direction of "Uncle 
Jimmie" are considered highlights of the year. 





ORQANIZATIONS 




M. Baldwin, E. Miller, Dr. Cole, B. Birch, A. Wildern, M. Bnckel, E. Miller. M. Rogers. 



Commoner Staff 



The compiling of a book like the Commoner has its pleasures as well as 
its sorrows. No doubt, you will find many mistakes: you weren't the first one 
to find them. There may be a few things that are original, or clever, or just 
plain good. If so, enjoy them: we have already. 

If the good things of this volume of the Commoner over-balance the others 
and the book serves as a bundle of priceless memories of a happy year at Bryan, 
then we, the staff, will consider the time and effort as well spent and the attempt 
a success. 

Several years hence, this Annual will in some ways be of greater interest 
than today. The scenes pictured here, the persons whose photos adorn these 
pages, the scholastic and forensic records, the groups of various sorts, will all 
bring to mind memories that will make you live these days over again. Per- 
haps you will smile at the crude apparatus as contrasted with the current day 
set-up. College life with all of its sunshine and shadow will be lived over again. 
This Annual and others like it will help to keep your love for Bryan constantly 
aglow. 

God bless you, dear classmates, as you take your place in this confused world. 
Be a good soldier for Christ — always pressing onward and upward toward the 
mark for the prize of the high calling of God, in Christ Jesus. 



26 



Thu 19 45 Commoner 



Newsette Staff 

The Neicsette staff is respon- 
sible for much of the printed 
material in the monthly, official 
news organ of Bryan, edited 
and printed on Bryan Hill. The 
Neivsette. with a circulation at 
present of nearly twelve thou- 
sand, informs the public of stu- 
dent and school life, scholastic. 
social and spiritual. Messages 
of both spiritual nature and 
Bible study are carried each 
month to every state and several 
foreign countries. The Neios- 
ette is in all ways and always 
governed by the application of 
our school motto. "God Above 
All." 




Beatrice Batson. Faculty Advisor: Rebecca Peck. Alumni Editor; M. Rogers, 
Editor: Dale Mead, Make-up Editor; F. Monck, Assistant Editor: Elaine Kennard, 
Campus Reporter. 



E. Kennard. H. Gow. G. Hartman ( Secretary). P. Miller. H. Parden. D. Baker 
(Vice-President). M. Rogers (President). F. Monck. H. Geiger. G. Cloer. H. Bald- 
win. L. Rowland. G. Standen. 




Journalism Club 

Have you a yen toward the 
pen? If so, ample opportunity 
for expression and development 
is offered by the Journalism 
Club. Members of the Jour- 
nalism Club often have the 
pleasure of seeing their news ar- 
ticles printed in the Newsette, 
official monthly publication of 
the university. Helpful criti- 
cism concerning one another's 
writings, analysis of great writ- 
ings, and instructions in the 
most modern journalistic prac- 
tices are benefits enjoyed by 
members of the Journalism 
Club. 




Fir^t roic — M. BrKkcl i Pri--,iil.jnt I . C. Marshall. R. Bodic ^Secrcury). H. 
Geiger. R. Kuhn. G. Standen. 

Second row — H. Gow. E. Christy. B. Birch. L. Mead. G. Rager. N. Martin, 
A. Northrup. A. Kettenring. 

Third rou: — L. Rowland. R. Williams, J. GuUey. H. Baldwin. H. Parden, E, 
Hall. M, Rogers. 



Child Evangelism 

One of the greatest fields for 
Christian service in the world is 
work among the leaders of to- 
morrow, the children of today. 
The future of all Christian serv- 
ice depends on the training we 
give them now. The Child 
Evangelism Fellowship makes it 
possible for students to organize 
groups of children in schools 
and homes. The salvation story 
is brought to them through the 
flannelgraph lessons, object les- 
sons and other visual aids. They 
are taught gospel choruses, scrip- 
ture verses, and Bible stories. 
Many of the children have come 
to know the Lord through this 
ministry. 



Foreign Missions 
Fellowship 

"Lift up your eyes, and look 
on the fields; for they are white 
already to harvest." 

Young men and women of 
the Foreign Missions Fellow- 
ship obey these words of the 
Lord as they study and discuss 
together foreign missions and 
missionaries. 

This organization consists of 
those students who intend to 
serve Christ in foreign fields, 
and those who want Co know 
more about missions that they 
may be faithful prayer warriors 
here at home. 

Informal discussions concern- 
ing the requirements of various 
mission boards add variety to 
the meetings. Book reports and 
facts on definite foreign fields 
help the students to be better 
informed. 

Special prayer meetings are 
held by this group to ask God's 
blessing upon those missionaries 
now serving Him and those who 
will serve in the future. 



Seated — C. Marshall, H. Gow. A. Rocs. H. Parden. P. Miller. M. Miller. B. 
Birch. D. Hess. B. Rosenau (President). A. Wildern (Secretary-Treasurer). M. 
Brickel. R. Williams. G. Standen. L. Howland. V. Smith. W. Chapman. M. L. Massie. 

Standing — B. Batson. H. Baldwin. R. Dew. F. Monck, E. Christy, R. Bodle. 
D. Risser. G. Hay. J. Quimby. E. Kennard. F. Manning, E. L. Hall, V. McBride, E. 
Miller, M. Baldwin. R. Kuhn. C. Graham, A, Northrup, A, Kettenring. 




Lay Ambassadors 

"Be instant in season and 
out of season." Those who have 
not been called to a definite field 
of Christian service may feel 
that their ministry is one of 
prayer and service wherever they 
may be. The Lay Ambassa- 
dors feel it a privilege to uphold 
in prayer those who are out in 
full-time service while endeav- 
oring to serve Christ in every 
way possible while still in 
school. It is the duty and priv- 
ilege of every Christian to be a 
personal worker in the spread- 
ing of the gospel, no matter 
what his occupation might be. 
A special study in soul winning 
has been conducted for Lay Am- 
bassadors by the club sponsor, 
Mr. N. O. Brooks. 




First cow — H, Lord, M. Rogers (Secretary-Treasurer). L. Peck (President), 
R. Witzky (Vice-President). 

Second roa' — A. Ahonen. G. Rager. D. Morgan. B. Morgan. D. Baker. R. 
Peck, A. Garber. N. Brooks (Sponsor). 

Third row — G. Cloer, F. Wachtel, L. Mead, G. Hartman, E. Campbell, B. 
Brooks. 



A. Rager. W. Jones. E. Leib, E. Peer (Secretary) . \V. Witzky (President) . D. 
Mead. E. Miller. R. Turner. Dr. Morgan (Sponsor). 




Student Pastors' 
Fellowship 

Let us introduce to you our 
group of promising young stu- 
dent pastors who plan to make 
the ministry of the Gospel their 
life service. 

This organization meets to 
talk over the problems in the 
life of a minister and to hear 
and give Gospel messages. The 
ministry of these young men is 
not only in the future: they 
learn by doing. Active service 
in schools, churches, and moun- 
tain missions does much to pre- 
pare them for the life of service 
ahead. 



'""Sir- 





Cheerleaders — G. Hay, J. Quimby. V. McBride. 

Front row — M. Miller (Forensic Captain). H. Parden, B. Birch. R. Dew, H. 
Baldwin, M. Brickel, V. Smith, W. Chapman. L. Rowland, R. Kuhn, L. Peck 
(Sports Captain) . 

Back row — A. Garber. A. Rager, G. Rager. L. Mead, F. Monck. D. Bechtel. 
F. Manning. R. Williams. E. Lieb. G. Hartman. D. Risser, F. Wachtel, E. Christy, 
A. Roos, A. Northrup. P. Smith, E. Miller, Baker. 



Scarlets 

"Down, but not out," say 
the Scarlets, when questioned 
concerning their records of 'al- 
most but not quite' victories of 
past years. They expect to 
arise with renewed strength and 
excel the performances of their 
opponents in forensics and 
sports. Their admonition to 
the Golds is, "Pride goeth be- 
fore a fall!" 



Cheerleaders — J. Cooper and E. Hall. 

First row — B. Rosenau (Sports Captain) . G. Cloer. R. Bodle. E. Kennard. 
H. Lord. H. Geiger, M. Rogers (Forensic Captain). 

Second row — A. Wildern, J. Gulley. E. Campbell. M. Massie. B. Brooks, H. 
Gow, N. Martin, A. Kettenring. 

Third row — E, Miller, E. Peer. W. Witz'ky. D. Mead. R. Turner. W. Jones. 

Fourth row — D. Morgan, B. Morgan. G. Standen, P, Miller, C. Marshall. G. 
Graham, M, Baldwin. 



Golds 



"Proud? Well, I'll say we 
are! Haven't we maintained a 
record of four successive victo- 
ries with a fifth on its way?" 
The Golds say this with a little 
fear and trembling lest the close- 
ly pressing Scarlets get the bene- 
fit of the laugh which is best. 
Scarlets and Golds are friendly 
opponents, chosen by an equal 
division of the student body, 
yet maintaining a unity that is 
greater than any division — that 
of unity in Christ. 




A fjA fi 



Who's Who 

Who's who in American 
colleges and universities 
includes a list of college and uni- 
versity students who have prov- 
en outstanding in character, 
scholarship, leadership, and ca- 
pacity for future usefulness to 
society. Each year outstanding 
students are given this distinc- 
tion of listing among the fore- 
most American youth. Who's 
Who provides an incentive to 
students to press onward in gen- 
uine achievements and get the 
best results from their college 
experiences. It is considered 
among the highest honors col- 
lege students can attain. 




L. Peck, M. Rogers, E. Miller, A. Northrup, A. Kettenring. 



J. Quimby. Vice-President: G. Hay (Senior). F. Monck. Secretary (Soph.): 
H. Baldwin. A. Rager (Freshmen) : A. Wildern, President (Junior) : B. Roscnau 
(Soph.). 




Student Council 

Do you have any problems, 
boys and girls? Step right up, 
the Student Council is ready to 
hear all! The student body pre- 
sents their suggestions and 
problems to the faculty through 
the Student Council, which con- 
sists of two representatives from 
each class. Those eligible for the 
Council are nominated by the 
faculty and voted upon by the 
class. 

Each Monday the council 
meets for a discussion of those 
problems presented to them by 
the students. These problems 
are then brought before the en- 
tire student body in a student 
body meeting, with the Council 
presiding. The problems or sug- 
gestions are then voted upon and 
presented to the faculty for their 
consideration as the students 
hopefully await the decision. 




First rote' — E. Kennard. J. Campbell. H. Gow, G. Standen. J. Cooper. R. Kuhn. 
H. Parden. P. Miller. 

Second roa' — H. Geiger. M. L. Massie. R. Williams. R. Bodle, C. Marshall. 
R. Dew. M. Miller. A. Northrup. 

Third row — Mrs. Garber, R. Peck. E. Campbell. A. Garber, N. Martin. L. 
Mead, V. McBride. L. Peck, G. Hay, D. Bechtel. B. Batson, A. Kettenring. M. 
Brickel, L. Rowland, B, Birch. 



Octagon 



The girls have been separated 
in number this year but not in 
spirit. About thirty Octagon- 
ettes make up life in the love- 
ly green and white Octagon 
(which has eight sides!). Mrs. 
Garber is the Counselor, and 
sympathetic mother to her large 
family of girls. The spacious 
central lobby into which all the 
rooms open is the place where 
the girls do their studying, pray- 
ing, dating, playing and fussing. 
The attractively furnished Oct- 
agon extends a cheerful "come 
in" to occupants and visitors. 



Seated — E. Hall. V. Smith. W. Chapman, M. Rogers, B. Morgan, D. Morgan, H. 
Baldwin. 

Standing — Mrs. Rudd. G. GuUey. E. Christy. M. Baldwin, A. Roos. B. Brooks, 
G. Hartman, G. Cloer. C. Graham, H. Lord. F. Wachtel, F. Monck. 



Hermitess Hall 

Quite a few changes have 
taken place since Hermits' Hall 
turned feminine. The routed 
Hermits would hardly recognize 
the beruffled and ribboned 
rooms as their former retreat. 
There are about twenty "Her- 
mites" occupying the second 
floor of the Administration 
building. A lovely reception 
room for social purposes is en- 
joyed by the entire student body 
and staff. Mrs. Rudd, in her 
gracious, charming way, serves 
as House Mother and makes life 
more home-like for the girls. 







Hermits' Hal! 

Hermits' Hall has changed lo- 
cation this year. The boys 
moved down and took the "Ca- 
lamity" out of the "Calamity 
Row," former home of the mar- 
ried students. Four large rooms 
provide living quarters for the 
"Hermits." During times other 
than quiet hours, the boys make 
their dormitory life most lively 
and pleasant, sometimes causing 
the passers-by to wonder about 
the "calamity" which is reputed 
to have been removed. They 
have their times of sweet fellow- 
ship in prayer when they kneel 
together in unity of spirit and 
mind and send up their mutual 
petitions to God. 




Front row — B. Rosenau. J. Quimby. D, Baker. D. Mead, D. Risser. 

Back roa: — R. Turner, P. Smith. Mr. Fish, E. Leib, F. Manning, W. Jones. 

Not pictured — N. O. Brooks, Boys' Counselor. 



Mr. and Mrs. Witzky, Mr. and Mrs. Rager, Mr. and Mrs. Miller, Mr. and 
Mrs. Peer and George Peer. 




Married Couples 

Above are pictured the vic- 
tims of "Calamity Hall". Their 
expressions of peace and con- 
tentment would not seem to in- 
dicate that they were adverse to 
the situation. 

Our married couples add to 
Bryan an atmosphere of home 
as they work and play together 
and prepare themselves for fu- 
ture full-time service for Christ. 



*W| 



^=^\ 



■ 


" 




. 


K < 




jM 


^q 


l'\ • '»^H 


4» , 

■■1 


Rk 


FRENCH CLUB 


^^^ 


SI 








Parlez-vous le francais bicn? If not. 


t-^-'^ 








here's your opportunity to improve! 
The French Club provides a means for 
further study of the language, devel- 


1 


1 ^ 1 


B ^^ 


1 




opment of conversational fluency and 
a study of the customs and habits of 
the French people. 

A "French table" in the dining 
room gives an opportunity for conver- 
sational practice. French plays planned 
to present the French idea serve to 
stimulate interest. 


ite 


-^.m 


^^ 


J 


1 


First rou.- — R. Witzky. V, Mc- 
Bridc. P. Smith. J. Cooper. C. Gra- 
ham. L. Rowland. Second roa" — D. 
Bechtel. A. Ahpnen. M. Massie, A. 
Gather. E. Campbell. G. Hartman. B. 
Witzky. 



SHAKESPEARE CLUB 

Shakespeare has been called the out- 
standing dramatist of all times: there- 
fore, those who are definitely interest- 
ed in knowing more about Shakespeare 
and his works, including those not 
enrolled in the Shakespeare class, have 
banded together to form a club. The 
purpose of this club is to create an 
interest in Shakespeare for those who 
may have the idea that it is dull and 
uninteresting, or to enrich the enjoy- 
ment of Shakespeare for those who 
find it interesting, by listening to rec- 
ords and entering into lively discus- 
sions concerning his works and its in- 
terpretation. The club, by practical 
experience in acting some of these 
dramas, gives the students means of 
establishing ease in presence of an au- 
dience. 

fronf — J. Quimby. G. Hay. B. Bat- 
son. Fi'rsf row — A. Kettenring. M. 
Brickel. B. Morgan. E. Miller. Second 
row — A. Northrup. D. Morgan, E. 
Miller. 




First rou.', seated — M. Rogers. Critic; L. Peck. Corres. Secy.; J. Quimby. Pres. ; 
G. Hay. Rec. Secy.; E. Kennard. Corres. Secy.; A. Wildern. Critic. Second row — 
R. Kuhn. L. Howland, G. Standen, M. Brickel. H. Baldwin, \V. Chapman. C. Marshall. 
C. Graham. R. Bodle. E. L. Hall. J. Cooper. P. Smith. M. L. Massie. H. Geiger. V. 
Smith. M. Baldwin. B. Batson. Third row — H. Lord. F. Wachtel. R. E. Williams. 
M. Miller. V. McBride. H. Gow. A. Roos. W. Witzky. R. Turner. F. Manning. G. 
Cloer. N. J. Martin. A. Ahonen, D. Baker. Fourth row — F. Monck. B. Birch. G. Hart- 
man. D. Risser. E. Leib. R. Witzkv. A. Garber. H. Parden. P. Miller. 




FORENSIC UNION 

There's fun at Forensic! That's 
what all the students say. and it's true. 
Forensic Union adds that sparkle that 
college life demands. It gives the stu- 
dents an opportunity to learn the 
methods and procedures of a formal 
meeting and to enjoy it while they 
learn. 

Every other Tuesday, this organi- 
zation meets and each program fol- 
lows a different theme. Special musi- 
cal numbers, book reports, readings, ex- 
temporaneous and impromptu speeches 
are given, each in keeping with the 
chosen theme. Parliamentary drill 
follows and then the Critic sums up 
the evening, giving helpful criticism 
wherever needed. 

A business meeting brings the eve- 
ning to a close and the students leave 
feeling refreshed after a time of fun 
and relaxation. 



muaw Z{Hioe\sit\j 



There's a college in the Southland, 

Where the mountains rear their heads 
And the waters of the streamlets 

Join in rocky river-beds. 
Here the light of sunset varies 

As the shadows seek and play 
To be like the mind's swift changes; 

When knowledge crowns each day. 

Here the youth from states full many 

Fellowship in joys and fears: 
And the character is forging 

Strong to stand the trials of years; 
Where God's gifts and mercy rising 

Is replete with mirth galore, 
And the heaps of garnered blessings 

Crowd the fullness more and more. 

Let us cherish, then, the spirit 

Which we gather from the air — 

As we study, toil and play here, 
And the fields and beauty share; 

We must raise our flags and pennants. 
Raise our shouts in fun and glee 

As we count our many pleasures 
That come constantly from Thee. 

Well we know, the friendships garnered 

Our great hopes and future weal. 
Knit together on this campus 

As the pleasant evenings steal; 
Hope's eternal visions strengthened 

As we tread the college hall 
Will be chains of golden splendor, 

Resting lightly on us all. 

• — Glenn Gates Cole. 



36 The 1945 Commoner 




LOOK THIS WAY . . . 

For better ads and snappier snaps. 



W. L. HODGES & SON 

JEWELERS AND OPTOMETRISTS 
CHINA AND GLASS 

Repair Work a Specialty 

DAYTON, TENNESSEE 


THE DAYTON HERALD 

The Only Newspaper Published in Rhea County 

COMMERCIAL PRINTING 
OFFICE SUPPLIES 

// it's printed. WE have it or can get it for you. 

Phone 43 Dayton 

P. O. BOX 286 DAYTON, TENNESSEE 


FAITH THEOLOGICAL SEMINARY 

1303 Delaware Avenue 
Wilniinglon 19, Delaware 

A growing student body. 

An emphasis on the original languages 
of Scripture. 

A foursquare stand for the Faith. 

Fundamental Premillennial Scholarly 


BURKART-SCHIER COMPANY 

Industrial Chemists 
CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 


Bakers Market 

ON THE SQUARE 

T 

WELCOMES YOU AND SOLICITS 
YOUR PATRONAGE 

T 

Quality you can trust 
Prices you can afford 

T 

DAYTON, TENNESSEE 
Phone 56 


F. E. Robinson 
Company 

"The Student's Drug Store" 

T 

It's our pleasure 

to serve 
Bryan students 

T 

Phone 102 

DAYTON, TENNESSEE 



The 1945 Commoner 



39 



Coniplitnents of 

THE CHURCH OF GOD 
PUBLISHING HOUSE 

Montgomery Avenue 
Cleveland, Tennessee 


Compliments of 

J. L. McPHEETERS 

DEPUTY SHERIFF 


ComplimenU of 

KELSO BALLARD 

SHERIFF 


MORGAN FURNITURE 

Dayton, Tennessee 


JOHNSON HARDWARE 

Phone 191 Daj^on 


BEN BLOCK 

Clothing Store 

Dayton, Tennessee 


Compliments of 

BEDFORD DI3IE STORE 

Dayton, Tennesc-ee 



40 



The 1945 Commoner 



Dayton Bank & Trust Company 

We are prepared to take care of your banking needs, what- 
ever they are. We extend a cordial invitation to all to make 
use of our banking facilities. 

DAYTON, TENNESSEE 

Member . . . Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 



f / 




For a Lift. . 



Colonial 




o4. 



Bread 



WALTER LLOYD COAL COMPANY 

Dealers in 

Sewanee Seam Coal 



L. A. Morgan, Secretary-Treasurer 
DAYTON, TENNESSEE 



Compliments 
of 

ROGERS DRUG STORE 
Dayton, Tennessee 



Compliments 

LOCKE FURNITURE COMPANY 

Dayton, Tennessee 



You Like 

Magical and Mechanical 

Object Lessons 
For Church and School 
Three-cent Stamp Brings 
List 

CHARLES MORRISON 

Gospel Illustrator 
21 HOWELL STREET NICHOLS, N. Y. 




The 1945 Commoner 



41 



Give Young America the 



BIBLE 



Whether in Sunday School or Daily Vacation Bible School, boys and girls need the Bible. 
Nothing else will do as their basic text book. 1945 conditions call for strong guidance 
through the Word of God — for all age groups. 



All Bible Graded Series 

of Sunday School Lessons 

Embraces the full scope of Gods Word. Depart- 
mentally graded to insure keenest pupil interest. 
Worship services for each department are correlated 
with the lesson. Separate manual for the pupil 
from .Juniors through Seniors. Visual aids avail- 
able for use with the ALL BIBLE GRADED 
SERIES make the Word live in the hearts of boys 
and girls in Beginner, Primary and Junior de- 
partments. 

Prices are reasonable : 

Teachers' Manuals, 25 cents each. 
Pupils' Manuals, 1 2 cents each. 



"Superior" Summer 
School Series 

of Lessons for the Daily 

Vacation Bible School 

A complete-to-the-last-detail program for Begin- 
ner. Primary. Junior and Intermediate departments. 
Yet. the series is flexible enough to permit changes 
to suit individual ideas. Based solidly on the Bible- 
Fascinating handwork and recreation are correlated 
with the lesson for each age group. Separate unit 
for every department. Geared to 1945 needs. 

Teachers' Manuals, each department. 25 cents; Pu- 
pils' Workbooks. 1 2 cents. 



Complete information on request to 



SCRIPTURE PRESS SOO N. Clark St.. Chicago lO, m. 



MODERN WAY CLEANERS 

Da'vton, Tennessee 



THE THRIFT STORE 

PETER'S DIAMOND BRAND SHOES 
DRY GOODS HOSIERY 

Dayton, Tennessee 



Wishing You God's Blessing Always 

MR. AND MRS. CHARLES E. WILKINSON 

Makers of Novelties for Sunday School 

Teachers Combination Scripture Text and 

Christian Card Calendars 

The Greatest Value Spiritually for All 

Christians 

Also "1 Believe It All''" Bible Pennants and 

Bookmarks 

Address: 654 Jackson Ave., Ardslev, Pa. 



LAY & COMPANY. INC. 

5c, 10c, and 25c Stores 



THE BETHEL PL^LISHING CO. 

1819 S. 3LAIN STREET, ELKHART. INDLANA 

"H"ill, upon request, send a copy of their 
1945 catalog of Church and Sunday 
School Supplies. Special discounts to 
Ministers. Churches, and Schools. 

Ask for samples of Bethel S. S. literature. 

^ e tithe our income. 



SACRED PIANO SOLOS 
"There's a Wideness in God's Mercy" 
"Blessed by the Fountain" 
"Safe in the .\rnis of Jesus" 
Classical arrangements. Original introduc- 
tions. Rich harmonies. Brilliant cadenzas. 
Chimes, etc. 

35c Each — All Three for Sl.OO Postpaid 

Order from 

GORDON E. HOOKER 



558 S. Hope St. 



Los .4ngeles 13. Calif. 



42 



The 1945 Commoner 



An Invitation 

We advise young men who aspire to a denomi- 
national ministry, to take their training and se- 
cure their ordination under the auspices of the 
denomination in which Ihey expect to function. 
However, if you are a Fundamental Pastor, Mis- 
sionary, or Evangelist, regardless of sex, now in 
Interdenominational or Undenominational work, 
or you expect to be so engaged, and are hungry 
for the spiritual fellowship and solidarity of an 
Association in which you will be able to feel the 
warmth, friendship and cooperation of a large, 
consecrated family of Gospel Workers, then we 
say: "Come with us and we will do thee good." 

The Fundamental Ministerial 

Association 

BOX 921 JOLIET, ILLINOIS 


FRENCH FURNITURE COMPANY 

FURNITURE APPLIANCES 

and 

JEWELRY 

Phone 325 Daylon, Tennessee 


MOUNTAIN CITY STOVE 
COMPANY 

CAFETERIA EQUIPMENT 
1240 Market St. Chattanooga, Tenn. 


Cotnpliinents 
of 

HARRIS & HOGSHEAD 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 


HANON RADIO SERVICE 

Home Owned and Operated 

Serving to Please You 

PHONE 110 DAYTON, TENNESSEE 


BEN FRANKLIN STORE 

Formerly Shavers Novelty Store 
MARKET STREET DAYTON, TENN. 


WESTERN AUTO ASSOCIATE 
STORE 

FURNITURE 

HARDWARE 

AUTO PARTS 

Phone 157 Dayton, Tenn. We Deliver 


GOOD WORK SPEAKS FOR ITSELF. 
Poor work is not worth speaking for. 

CITY DRY CLEANING 


JENKINS and DARWIN BROS. 

UNDERPRICED 
MERCHANDISE 

Dayton, Tennessee 


HY-WAY GARDEN FLORISTS 

Phone 335 

Dayton, Tennessee 



The 1945 Commoner 



45 




'Wo GREAT BOOKS By VVm. R- Newe« 



No Christian should be without them. The best gift you can distribute 
to your friends, to Missionaries and Bible Students — all ■will be grateful 
for the blessing that comes through reading Mr. Newell's exposition. 

ROMANS • Verse by Verse 

Many say that, outside of the Bible, no book has helped them under- 
stand the Gospel of the Grace of God like Mr. Newell's "ROMANS". 
A verse by verse exposition appealing equally to all 
Believers. 576 pages, 16 chapters. Postpaid, $2.00. 



REVELATION 



"THINGS WHICH MUST 
SHORTLY COME TO PASS 

A helpful, interesting and sane exposition of the last book of the Bible. 
Ministers, Bible teachers, and every earnest Christian will find here fresh 
understanding of the message of Revelation. The prophecies treated are 
rapidly approaching fulfillment. 404pages, 22 chapters. Postpaid $2.00. 

Order from your dealer, or from 
GRACE PUBLICATIONS °c^' 100 VV. Chicago Ave., Chicago 10, lli: 




Each 
S2.00 



Cline Studios 



COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHY . 
KODAKS FINISHING 



PORTRAITS 
SUPPLIES 



115 East Eighth 



Phone 6-3418 

Chattanooga, Tennessee 





GARRISON & FITZGERALD 


MILLS AND LUPTON SUPPLY 


VOLUNTEER FOOD STORE 


COMPANY 


THE BEST IN GROCERIES 


SUPPLIES FOR ALL INDUSTRIES 


Phones 300-301 


Chattanooga, Tennessee 


MEATS — Phone 29 




Dayton, Tennessee 



Grace Theological Seminary 

A standard theological school where the whole Word of God is honored and 
the high academic demands of Christian Scholarship are directed toward 
a practical Christian Ministry, with the following purposes and ideals: 



A Bible-centered Curriculum 
A Competent and Believing Scholarship 
A Missionary and Evangelistic Devotion 
A Spirit-filled and Separated Life 



A Premillenial Hope and Viewpoint 
A Spiritual and Prayer-charged Environment 
An Expository Preaching and Teaching 
Ministry 



COURSES LEAD TO RECOGNIZED THEOLOGICAL DEGREES AND ARE OPEN TO 
ALL WORTHY AND PROPERLY QUALIFIED STUDENTS 

No tuition charges. Approved by the Indiana Department of Education for the training 
of Veterans. Preferable entering date for first year students, June 25. 

Alva J. McClain, President Herman A. Hovt, Registrar 

WINONA LAKE, INDIANA 



46 



The 194 5 Commoner 



r 



M. Schild and 
Company 

CANNERS : STEARNS COAL 
ICE CREAM : MILK 

T 

Our Cream 
Is Served by F. E. Robinson 
And All Eating Places in Dayton 

T 

Phone 3 
DAYTON, TENNESSEE 


M. B. Eaves Produce 
Company 

T 

Wholesale and Retail 
FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

▼ 

702 East 11th Street 
CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE 


CITY BARBER SHOP 

Best Wishes to Bryan University 
SECOND AVE. DAYTON, TENNESSEE 


HOTEL AQUA 

CHICKEN AND STEAK DINNERS 
Dayton, Tennessee 


MRS. E. B. ARNOLD 

Ready-to-Wear 


PURSER & KNIGHT 

SHOES . . . CLOTHING 
Market Street Dayton, Tennessee 


COLUMBIA BIBLE COLLEGE 

Robert C. McQuilkin, President 

BIBLE COLLEGE AND SEMINARY 
COURSES LEADING TO DEGREES 

Columbia, South Carolina 


ABEL HARDWARE CO. 

Anything and Everything in Hardware 

Purina Feed — Baby Chicks 
PHONE 164 DAYTON, TENNESSEE 



The 1945 Commoner 



49 



FOX BROTHERS COMPANY 

(INSTITUTION DEPARTMENT) 

CHATTANOOGA 



Distributors of 

FEATHERLITE Flour 

TEA GARDEN Preserves and Jellies 



COMPLETE LINE OF NO. 10 FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 

Pickles and Olives in Glass 



Coinpliinents 
of 

DR. A. M. MORGAN 



BROWN CHEVROLET COMPANY 

SALES — CHEVROLET — SERVICE 
Dayton, Tennessee 



SAWYER'S FUNERAL SERVICE 

Ambulance 

Day 28-J — PHONE — Night 28-R 

C. Paxton Sawvers, Manager 



KING BROS. SHOE REPAIR 



REASONABLE PRICES 



Market Street Dayton, Tennessee 



50 



The 1945 Commoner 



COMPLIMENTARY ADS 

Hardie and Caudle 
H. S. Kress & Co. 
The Vogue 
Lovemans 

Edwards and LeBron 
Miller Brothers 
United Shoe Repair Co. 
Major D. W. Ryther 




"TABERNACLES" 

Bryan students "Tabernacle" for a time in the 
incomplete buildings of Brvan hill; Christians "tab- 
ernacle" during life's sojourn in the unfinished 
bodies of the flesh, but we are "complete in Christ" 
and The Holy Spirit is willing to live in the taber- 
nacles of our bodies now and we shall be yet revealed 
in our glorious new bodies. 

Such assurances and glories are discussed simply 
each month in 

The Conqueror ! 

Edited by Mrs. E. M. McClusky who recommends 
Bryan as a God-given privilege for students and those 
who care to invest money for God's glory. 

To subscribe to The Conqueror! send $1.25 to 

MIRACLE BOOK CLUB, INC. 

1652 Noble Dr., N. E.. Atlanta, Ga. 



This page has been removed due to 
privacy concerns. 



A Twinco Yearbook, Twin City Printing Co., Champaign, Illinois 



BRYAN UNIVERSITY LISRAKY 



'I'HIS BOOK MAY BE KEPT 


14 Days 


and may be renewed if not called for by 

someone else. 

A fine of 20 per day is cliarged if tiie book 

is kept after the last date stamped below. 


DUE DUE DUE 


J/-', b '■^■^ 




1 


r.-r - - 'ft 






\!rr ' r ".* 






fSerdb^, 






DEC ' ■ 






^07 m 






9Bpiim 






^!EP ac^f) 


^i 


i 
1 



TAKEN FROM TH« Room